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Mrs Rachael Haynes

Psychological Sciences

Biography

Rachael Haynes is a Lecturer in the Discipline of Psychological Sciences at the Australian College of Applied Psychology at the Brisbane Campus.  Rachael is interested in using research to develop the psychological knowledge-base.  Rachael is completing her PhD in Maladaptive Daydreaming (early 2020).  She holds a Master’s degree in Applied Forensic Psychology, having carried out research into eyewitness memory and also holds a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology.  She is a Registered Psychologist, with extensive experience in providing mental health support and psychological therapy to children, young adults and adults.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachael_Haynes 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/rachael-haynes-psychologist

Research Interests

Her research interests include exploring Maladaptive Daydreaming, self-care of health professional, compassion fatigue, the use of humour in therapy, the use of creative teaching to develop early-career health professionals and the development of health-related mental health strategies. 

Expert Comment Topics

  • Maladaptive Daydreaming 
  • Ethics 
  • Qualitative Research 
  • Grounded Theory 
  • Psychopathology 
  • Therapeutic Interventions 

Professional Affiliations and Fellowships

  • Registered Psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia
  • Board Approved Supervisor with the Psychology Board of Australia
  • Member of the Australian Psychological Society (APS)
  • Member of the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP)

Conference Presentations

  • International Conference of Applied Psychology, Montreal (2018) - GIMME 5 presentation.  Two Case Studies of Mature Australian Maladaptive Daydreamers. 
  • ‘Share the Knowledge’ Conference, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst (2019).  Two Case Studies of Mature Australian Maladaptive Daydreaming. 
  • Key note speaker, Western Region Rural Australian Psychological Society Annual General Meeting, Bathurst (2019). Two Case Studies of Australian Maladaptive Daydreaming.